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Monday, January 14
 

2:00pm

Council of Data Facilities General Assembly Meeting
The Council of Data Facilities (CDF) is committed to working with relevant agencies, professional associations, initiatives, and other complementary efforts to enable transformational science, innovative education, and informed public policy through increased coordination, collaboration, and innovation in the acquisition, curation, preservation, and dissemination of geoscience data, tools, models, and services. Existing and emerging geoscience data facilities – through the Council – are committed to serving as an effective foundation for EarthCube. The General Assembly meeting is open to the official representatives from all member data facilities, additional member organization personnel as desired by the members, as well as observers.

Moderators
Monday January 14, 2019 2:00pm - 5:00pm
 
Tuesday, January 15
 

7:30am

ESIP 101
Tuesday January 15, 2019 7:30am - 8:30am

8:45am

Meeting Welcome and Overview
Tuesday January 15, 2019 8:45am - 9:00am

9:00am

PLENARY TALK | Increasing the impact of the Smithsonian’s geological collections
Adam has worked with the Department of Mineral Sciences at the Smithsonian since 2010. At the Smithsonian, he oversees data about one of the largest, most comprehensive geological collections in the world. Because the national collections are a tremendous resource, Adam is always looking for ways to ensure that the data about them is accurate, complete, and accessible to earth science researchers. Adam earned an MS in Geochemistry from the University of Maryland.

Speakers

Tuesday January 15, 2019 9:00am - 9:30am

9:30am

PLENARY TALK |

Tuesday January 15, 2019 9:30am - 10:00am

10:00am

PLENARY TALK | From Baseline Science Instruments to CubeSats: Challenges and Opportunities with the Growth of Space Based Data Acquisition and the Commercial World
Dan Pilone is CEO/CTO of Element 84 and oversees the architecture, design, and development of Element 84's projects including supporting NASA, the USGS, Stanford University School of Medicine, and commercial clients. He has supported NASA's Earth Observing System for nearly 13 years; currently acting as Chief Technologist for the NASA EOSDIS Evolution and Development 2 contract. He has supported transitioning NASA’s PB scale archive to the cloud, contributed to metadata standards, led multiple working groups on data services and cloud architectures, authored studies on architecture and transition plans for cloud-native data management solutions, and helped shape software development processes for both government and commercial clients.

Speakers

Tuesday January 15, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am

10:30am

Break
Tuesday January 15, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am

11:00am

Approaching Sustainability with Techniques from an Entrepreneurial Mindset
Sustaining our data resources is part of the bigger issue of sustaining all research products. As we contemplate technologies to enable this, we must also consider organizational and financial enablements. The Science Gateway Community Institute recently conducted a session to work on characterizing 11 ESIP related projects in terms of concepts borrowed from entrepreneurship. This panel will focus on discussion of some of those results and their applicability in a broader sense to sustainable data infrastructures and repositories.

Moderators
Tuesday January 15, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm

11:00am

GIS in the Cloud for Sustainability
Sustainability’s geospatial processes are complex since environmental, societal, and economic systems are deeply interconnected. This creates challenges for sustainability researchers because the impact from changes in one system are not always well understood or predictable for the other systems. As a result, extracting timely and meaningful insights for sustainability decision making requires often large datasets and analytics from many different domains, and interoperable tools capable of capturing the multidimensional nature of sustainability and environmental problems. To address these challenges, sustainability users are exploring the use of the cloud to leverage the scalable storage and analytical capabilities. In this session, we explore cloud-based scalable workflows and applications of GIS technology to derive insights for sustainability.

Moderators
Tuesday January 15, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm

11:00am

The "I&R" in FAIR: Who develops, approves, and governs domain-specific standards in the Earth, Space, & Environmental Sciences?
Researchers, data repositories, publishers, funders, and other stakeholders are increasingly obligated to ensure that data are not only open, but also FAIR - findable, accessible, interoperable, and re-usable. Various initiatives, projects, and working groups are working to advance the implementation of the FAIR principles, among them the AGU project "Enabling FAIR Data", the European GOFAIR initiative, and Working Groups within the RDA and WDS. This efforts are making it increasingly clear that many aspects of FAIRness, specifically reusability, are highly context and domain specific. The original FAIR guiding principles explicitly point to “domain-relevant community standards (R1.3.)”, but there are many open questions regarding such domain-relevant community standards: Who develops and maintains them? Who has the authority to approve them and govern them? How granular do domain-specific standard definitions need to be?
This session is intended to foster a dialog between data repositories, researchers, and other stakeholders to clarify and address the above listed questions for the Earth, Space, and Environmental informatics community.


Tuesday January 15, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm

11:00am

Community resilience for earth science data institutions and place-based communities
This session examines how data and information can be a catalyst for overcoming social barriers in communities to help them realize and work collaboratively towards broadly appreciated, overarching goals, like the enhanced sustainability of their food and/or energy system. Concrete examples are drawn from both place-based and institutional communities, regarding how data and information are used in innovative ways to overcome challenges. Place-based examples include the assessment and mitigation of community vulnerability to climate change, such as in coastal communities. Institutional examples from governmental organizations, NGOs, and Private Sector entities demonstrate how their systems are better defined and efforts are best aligned in the context of their long established missions. These examples highlight how a re-framing of established norms through resilience thinking provides an innovative tool, and how the ESIP Federation can step into a leading role toward more effective and efficient use of the Nation’s earth science data and information within a community context.


Tuesday January 15, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm

12:30pm

Lunch
Tuesday January 15, 2019 12:30pm - 2:00pm

2:00pm

Applications of Semantic Technologies Across Earth Sciences
This session encourages use of semantic technologies which further the use and value of earth science data through linkage, interoperability and standardization.

Moderators
Speakers

Tuesday January 15, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm

2:00pm

Scaling Machine Learning Applications in Earth Sciences
This panel will focus on scalable architectures for implementing machine learning and AI models across Earth Sciences focus areas. The specific details would include both HPC and cloud-centric operational pipelines for automated data processing, parallel multi-GPU model implementations, cluster scheduling, resource optimization and time to delivery - a few tools of discussion can focus around DC/OS, Terraform/Nomad, and Kubernetes. In addition to compute constraints, the panel also encourages discussion on ML framework optimizations and operational complexity, including available frameworks and workflow tools like Tensorflow, Mxnet, Pytoch, Google ML pipeline, AWS Sagemaker and others. GPU hardware optimization is another topic of interest where the panel will focus on how new generation GPU’s (with more CUDA cores) are able to perform faster training as opposed to old generation GPUs.


Tuesday January 15, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm

2:00pm

NASA Metadata Models and Standards Round-Table
Round-table discussion about the UMM models, answer metadata questions from users, and gather any feedback for future improvements to the models based on user needs. Briefly discuss what's new with the models.

Moderators
Tuesday January 15, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm

2:00pm

Working Session: Exploring Jupyter Technologies for Educators
Members of ESIP's Education Committee invite attendees who have a working knowledge of Jupyter technologies to share information and examples that can be used in an introductory workshop for educators.

Moderators
avatar for Shelley Olds

Shelley Olds

Science Education Specialist, UNAVCO
Data visualization tools, Earth science education, human dimensions of natural hazards, disaster risk reduction (DRR), resilience building.

Speakers

Tuesday January 15, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm

2:00pm

Want to know how to delight your repository users? - Usability can help!
Are you providing data services? Do you know what your users would say about using your services? If you answer yes to the first question but no to the second, you will want to join this session!

At the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), a new suite of data system tools is being developed and collectively called the NCAR Digital Asset Services Hub (DASH). It is crucial that the DASH services help the users in achieving their data goals regardless of whether or not they are familiar with data repositories. Additionally, it is vital that the user interactions are friendly and intuitive, so that the users will not mind coming back!

During this session, the attendees will have the opportunity to learn about the techniques that can be applied to a data repository, see evaluation examples and results from DASH, and practice how to evaluate the usefulness of a data repository by using the newly created DASH Repository as the test case.

Moderators
Tuesday January 15, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm

3:30pm

Break
Tuesday January 15, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm

4:00pm

Increasing the use and value of Earth science data and information through standards
This session presents the latest results from the OGC innovation program Testbed-14, which addressed several topics that are directly inline with this year's ESIP theme of "increasing the use and value of Earth science data and information". The OGC innovation program is the experimentation lab of OGC, where new technologies are explored that enhance earth observation research and science. Testbed-14 addressed among others topics new standardized approaches to access and exploit satellite swath data (level 1 and 2); explored enhanced, resource-oriented, discovery and access mechanisms for geospatial data and information that reduces the burden on clients, as data can be browsed in addition to being queried; developed an architecture to execute any type of application physically close to Big data; explored quoting and billing mechanisms for geospatial products; developed an architecture to integrate machine learning and artificial intelligence into earth science workflows.


Tuesday January 15, 2019 4:00pm - 5:30pm

4:00pm

Cloud Analytics Reference Architecture
NASA's Cloud Analytics Reference Architecture (CARA) Working Group was established at the 2018 Earth Science Data Systems Working Group (ESDSWG) annual meeting to define a reference architecture enabling discovery and analysis of big data in cloud environments. Current key activities include gathering use cases for cloud analytics, and development of the reference architecture document. The goal of this working session is to inform the ESIP community of the CARA WG's efforts to date, and solicit review and contributions to the use cases and reference document.

Moderators
Tuesday January 15, 2019 4:00pm - 5:30pm

4:00pm

Research Objects, What are They and How do You Cite Them and The Latest in ESIP Software and Data Citations
As data, software and services have citations there are other objects that do not fall easily into these categories. These “Research Objects” can include ontologies, semantics, physical samples, etc. As these are used as elements in one’s research they should be properly attributed to and referenced, thus citable. This session will discuss and try to quantify what research objects are, how do they effect the research community and how can the current citation formats be used or adjusted to suit a wider breadth of objects.

Moderators
Tuesday January 15, 2019 4:00pm - 5:30pm

4:00pm

Mapping & Connecting the Earth Science Project Landscapes
There are many efforts underway to map the landscape of projects in earth science, including Research Data Alliance, EarthCube, ESIP and the RISCAPE project in Europe. This session will provide the current status of many of these efforts. We would also like to use this session to describe how ESIP meeting participants can contribute to the mapping effort during the Winter Meeting.
Ideally this session would be scheduled on Tuesday to give meeting participants to add to the landscape that be available during the meeting for additions and corrections.


Tuesday January 15, 2019 4:00pm - 5:30pm

4:00pm

ESIP's Marine Data Cluster - Introduction and Development of Focus Areas
This session will introduce the Marine Data Cluster with brief presentations from chairs and founding members, followed by an open discussion on what the Marine Data Cluster should focus on in the first year. What problems will we tackle? What are the most important Marine Data topics on which this group can focus its efforts? We will also brainstorm the infrastructure and support needs and opportunities of the cluster.


Tuesday January 15, 2019 4:00pm - 5:30pm

6:00pm

Poster Session & Reception
Tuesday January 15, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm
 
Wednesday, January 16
 

8:30am

10:30am

Break
Wednesday January 16, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am

11:00am

Machine Learning Cluster Breakout
We'll introduce the cluster and Rob and Hook will each present some current work involving machine learning. A better title and abstract will be forthcoming.


Wednesday January 16, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm

11:00am

ESIP Funded Project Report Out
Hear the outcomes of the 2018 ESIP Lab funded projects.

Moderators
avatar for Annie Burgess

Annie Burgess

ESIP Lab Director, ESIP

Wednesday January 16, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm

11:00am

GCMD Keyword Management Process and Lifecycle
Show the process for GCMD keywords - fast track and yearly reviews through the ESDIS Standards Office, and how Earth science users can influence keyword additions and modifications. Highlight how keywords facilitate the discovery of EOSDIS data and services. Upcoming keyword reviews.

Moderators
Wednesday January 16, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm

11:00am

Enhanced Reality: Data Visualization and Immersive Technologies
Across industries and government, there are many groups working with virtual, augmented, and mixed reality technologies inside and outside of the realm of Earth science. In this dynamic panel, we will hear from scientists and researchers working with VR/AR/MR from various scientific disciplines about their approach to data visualization techniques. Interdisciplinary work and complex data sets will provide interesting perspective to the ongoing exploration of how immersive technologies can be used for Earth science and beyond.


Wednesday January 16, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm

11:00am

FAIR Samples and Collections in the Earth, Space, & Environmental Sciences
FAIR principles need to be applied to all outputs of scientific research, including physical materials such as natural and synthetic specimens that are collected as part of the scientific process. Making physical samples and collection FAIR requires virtual representations of the physical objects that can be located on the web via a persistent identifier and that are documented with sufficient metadata that are persistently accessible in trustworthy metadata catalogs to be findable and reusable, and that follow standard protocols for accessibility and interoperability. While best practices for sample identification, documentation, and citation are emerging, there are many open questions and challenges that need to be solved, including vocabularies and ontologies for describing and classifying samples; effective and consistent ways to link samples with the literature and digital data; as well as policies and infrastructure for trustworthy curation of the sample metadata and of the actual physical objects. In this session we will look at ongoing and new initiatives related to physical samples as part of digital research data infrastructure and explore how ESIP can facilitate collaborative solutions to some of the most urgent problems.


Wednesday January 16, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm

12:30pm

Lunch | Peer recognition Ceremony
Wednesday January 16, 2019 12:30pm - 2:00pm

2:00pm

Linked Metadata
Metadata standards can support many use cases and approaches to sharing information about many kinds of resources. This session provides an opportunity for data providers and researchers to share ideas about needs and solutions.

Moderators
Wednesday January 16, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm

2:00pm

Soils Data Integration Challenges throughout the Research Data Lifecycle
The use of soils data within the Earth sciences often requires the researcher to harmonize and reconcile data from multiple sources. This process can take up to 80% of a researcher’s time (OGC, 2016). Multiple groups are discussing standards for data collection, archival, and metadata to increase the ease-of-use and portability of data. These groups include (1) the International Union of Soil Sciences Working Group on Soil Information Standards, which has conducted an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Soil Data Interoperability Experiment (OGC, 2016); (2) the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Global Soil Partnership, which has developed the “Five Pillars of Action” -- three of which relate directly to the research data lifecycle (UNFAO, 2018); (3) the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), which has co-convened a Data Science in Agriculture Summit (NIFA, 2017); and (4) the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), which recently released a technical note on common protocols to improve data quality and facilitate data sharing (NRCS, 2018).

In this session, we will hear from speakers in the Earth sciences community who are utilizing soils data in their research. We will focus on integration challenges they've had using these data through the research data lifecycle, from data creation to archival in a repository for re-use. The session will also provide perspectives on how these problems were (or may be) addressed and the effect these problems -- and solutions -- have on data analysis and the re-use of data. We will have presentations from researchers conducting both primary and secondary research, with the goal of highlighting solutions and next steps for the use and curation of soils data in the Earth sciences. By the end of the session, we aim to have identified the major challenges in using and re-using soils data, particularly as they relate to the use of soils standards.

References

NIFA, 2017, Data Science in Agriculture Summit (https://nifa.usda.gov/data-science-agriculture-summit)
NRCS, 2018, USDA Releases Standard Indicators and Laboratory Procedures to Assess Soil Health for Public Comment (https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/national/newsroom/releases/?cid=NRCSEPRD1420430)
OGC, 2016, OGC Soil Data Interoperability Experiment (https://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/?artifact_id=69891)
UNFAO, 2018, The 5 pillars of action
http://www.fao.org/global-soil-partnership/pillars-action/en/

Moderators
Wednesday January 16, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm

2:00pm

Triage in the Data ward: A collaborative working session for developing a data rescue decision framework
Data rescue requires resources that are often scarce, and can also hinge of the timeliness of rescue efforts. Efforts by ESIP, RDA, EarthCube, and the IMLS-funded Data Rescue Toolkit have all focused on the development of elements to help focus and motivate data rescue efforts and improve the efficiency of efforts in the future. A clear need from within the community is to help synthesize findings from each of these groups, and to obtain input from the broader geosciences community, those actively involved in ad hoc data rescue efforts, and other issues around data rescue that may be particular to that community.

This session will begin with a brief overview of the work accomplished by the various groups mentioned above, and provide an introduction to the goals of the newly-approved CODATA Task Group, Improving Data Access and Reusability (IDAR-TG). The IDAR-TG highlights the importance and timeliness of not only data rescue, but also the need to collect and/or develop tools and frameworks to assist with assessing what data is in most need of rescuing.

The majority of the session will be a working session where we will discuss what characteristics of the data and its environment (repository, funding stream, etc.) increase data’s risk level, what considerations need to be made when deciding whether the data needs to be rescued, what resources are already available for this task, and how the Data Nomination Tool and other activities in the Data Rescue Toolkit project might be able to help.

Moderators
avatar for Denise Hills

Denise Hills

Director, Energy Investigations, Geological Survey of Alabama
Long tail data, data preservation, connecting physical samples to digital information, geoscience policy, science communication

Speakers

Wednesday January 16, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm

2:00pm

20 years of Making Data Matter
A review of results from data collected among ESIP members about their perspective and vision of the changing state of making Earth Science data matter.

Moderators
Wednesday January 16, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm

2:00pm

Test-drive earthdata.nasa.gov: Is this ride good for you?
The NASA Earth Science Data System program, which hosts all of NASA’s Earth science data collections, is currently working to improve access to those data holdings and information. In this working session, we want to get to know you, the driver, but then want to task you with test-driving the process of accessing data through the earthdata.nasa.gov site. You can provide feedback and suggestions on site intuitiveness, data access, and data manipulation, noting any pain points or needs that you have. Your valuable input will be used to build an effective site, that not only increases the use of but also the value of Earth science data through NASA.


Wednesday January 16, 2019 2:00pm - 3:30pm

3:30pm

Break
Wednesday January 16, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm

4:00pm

The Metadata Game
The Metadata Game brings teams together to collaborate to create complete metadata repositories.

Moderators
Wednesday January 16, 2019 4:00pm - 5:30pm

4:00pm

Provenance for connecting climate adaptation decisions to data
Our ESIP Lab funded project asked the question: how effectively can we capture the provenance between data products and decisions? We still do not have all the answers, but we hope you’ll find this session thought provoking, regardless of whether you’re a provenance expert asking the same question, or a member of a climate resilience project looking for ways to find and adapt existing data-driven solutions, or a policy analyst estimating the socio-economic value of data by tracing decisions back to data.

Among the topics covered will be: ontologies for capturing decision making, machine parsing of human readable documents to extract concepts, capturing decisions using process frameworks like the US Climate Resilience Toolkit planning guidelines and the National Park Service’s climate change scenario planning guidelines, text mining legally mandated public records for resilience infrastructure, and others. Audience feedback to our findings will be used to guide follow-on activities.


Wednesday January 16, 2019 4:00pm - 5:30pm

4:00pm

Decentralized Data Stewardship
How can we make it possible to coordinate management, replication, and governance of data on decentralized infrastructure? What efficiencies can we gain? What practices and lessons from centralized data governance should we take care to protect or learn from? ...and what does 'decentralized infrastructure' even mean!? Let's talk, together.

Moderators
Wednesday January 16, 2019 4:00pm - 5:30pm

4:00pm

Community Curated Metadata Extractors
How can science communities come together to create tools that automatically derive data from files?


Wednesday January 16, 2019 4:00pm - 5:30pm

4:00pm

Maturing the Operational Readiness Level – ORL Framework for Disasters Applications
The Disasters Lifecycle cluster in collaboration with the All Hazards Consortium developed initial ORLs with the electric utilities, and is now “operationalizing” ORLs for data-driven decision-making support to improve situational awareness. The criteria for the ORLs and a flowchart assessment tool, exercised by the AHC team at Duke Energy for response to the 2018 Hurricane Florence, proved very useful. The initial ORL criteria were defined for the electric sector’s use to transport work crews and restore power after destructive storms. However the usability criteria is expected to change for different disaster scenarios. Some factors may go across many use cases for many applications, such as security criteria that is key to establishing trust. However other factors are driven by the use case to address latency or resolution criteria. Work continues on refining strategies and criteria for assessing candidate datasets for specific operational use cases, and maturing the ORL concept as a Framework for different applications.

During this session we plan to address the issue of terminology to seek a common vocabulary relevant to various disasters application, leveraging what we’ve learned from the electric utility sector. We also would like to examine the ORL assessment tool and how the current ORL criteria are applied and look for gaps and lessons learned. The goal is to refine a framework strategy enabling the ORL concept to be applied to other disasters applications.

Moderators
Wednesday January 16, 2019 4:00pm - 5:30pm
 
Thursday, January 17
 

9:00am

PLENARY TALK |
Michael H. Freilich is the Director of the Earth Science Division, in the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters. Prior to joining NASA, he was a Professor and Associate Dean in the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University. He received BS degrees in Physics (Honors) and Chemistry from Haverford College in 1975 and a Ph.D. in Oceanography from Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Univ. of CA., San Diego) in 1982. From 1983-1991 he was a Member of the Technical Staff at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Speakers

Thursday January 17, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am

10:00am

PLENARY TALK | The Fourth National Climate Assessment: Translating Data to Inform Decisions
Dan Barrie is a program manager in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) Climate Program Office (CPO). Within CPO, he manages the Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections program, which focuses on model development, improvements to predictions and projections of climate conditions, and analysis of the climate system toward improved modeling and predictions. Dan also manages the Assessments Program, and serves on the National Climate Assessment Steering Committee. Dan received a PhD in Atmospheric and Oceanic Science from the University of Maryland, where he focused on the interface between climate and energy systems. He earned a BA in Physics from Colgate University. Dan is an adjunct faculty member at Johns Hopkins University.

Speakers

Thursday January 17, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am

10:30am

Break
Thursday January 17, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am

11:00am

Semantics: Working to harmonize SWEET and ENVO
The ESIP Semantic Technologies committee has been working to harmonize ontologies in the Earth sciences with ontologies in other fields (environmental science, biology, chemistry, etc.). We will be working on harmonizing SWEET with ENVO, with particular concentration on cryospheric terminology.

Moderators
Thursday January 17, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm

11:00am

Filling the Earth Science Cookbook: Discovery and registry of Earth Science workflows from public repositories
The majority of scientific programming workflows are developed in isolation by graduate students and postdoctoral researchers. While packages and libraries in R and Python help support the advancement of scientific discovery, researchers are often challenged with combining and analysing data in new ways. Regardless, code use and re-use in the Earth Sciences is often complicated by the fact that few well-developed workflows exist as templates. Most code examples in R packages for example, use well-worn datasets that are not well suited to extrapolation for Earth Science applications. For this reason, the discovery and analysis of existing code resources, such as those undertaken by the FUNding Friday grant, become critical to providing resources to scientific programmers in the Earth Sciences.
This Session will introduce early-career researchers to the principle workflows for sharing code publicly, including discussion of some of the pros and cons of sharing code before it is “good enough”. The session will then provide an overview of work that has been undertaken to analyse a large number of Jupyter notebooks on GitHub, and then provide session members with an opportunity to help build the web of examples for coding resources, discussing what makes code useful as a “cookbook recipe” for Earth Sciences, what particular libraries or data resources are of interest, and how further automation might be undertaken.

Moderators
Speakers

Thursday January 17, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm

11:00am

Establishing Trust in Centralized Repositories
Centralized or common repositories expose data to new users by bringing together metadata from various archives into a single repository. Centralized repositories also serve as a one stop for data discovery and help increase the likelihood that data will be reused for new research and applications.

Since these repositories expose new users to new data, it is essential that the information provided in these repositories be trustworthy and reliable. Ensuring trustworthiness is an ongoing challenge for centralized repositories.

This session will focus on approaches to ensuring quality and trustworthiness in centralized repositories and the challenges faced by centralized repositories in meeting those goals.

Moderators
Thursday January 17, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm

11:00am

Evolving the Editorial Policies and Practices of the Data Management Training Clearinghouse: A Working Session
Since 2016, selection criteria have guided decisions made about the range, type and depth of educational resources published in the ESIP-hosted Data Management Training Clearinghouse (DMTC). The selection criteria were chosen with input from the first three organizational collaborators: ESIP, DataONE, and the U.S. Geological Survey. Once accepted for publication, the educational resources have been described using a subset of the Schema.org endorsed metadata schema for educational resources called the Learning Resource Metadata Initiative (LRMI) that is maintained by the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (http://dublincore.org/dcx/lrmi-terms/1.1/ ). Specific elements of the LRMI metadata scheme were then chosen as featured search facets and descriptive elements in the search results display of the DMTC.
In July of this year, the DMTC received an Institute of Museum & Library Services (IMLS) National Leadership Grant focused on the expansion of the disciplines in the Clearinghouse, and enhancing the discovery and evaluation of the resources in the DMTC. As a result, it is good time to solicit feedback from the science and social science researcher and trainer communities on the DMTC editorial policies described above. In this working session, participants serving as DMTC resource submitters, reviewers and editors will be invited to test current submission and editorial practice by choosing educational resources not yet included in the publishing queue, deciding whether to submit them for publication using the DMTC selection criteria, and describing them using the LRMI metadata elements present in the full DMTC submission form. A discussion will follow these individual or small group activities in which participants will be asked to provide feedback on what was challenging and/or positive about their experience. The purpose of the discussion will be to reflect upon how the editorial policies and practices affect the scope, range and potential for sustainable growth of the DMTC inventory. Information to provide context and background data for the activities will be distributed to participants ahead of time based on the Sched participant list.

Moderators
Thursday January 17, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm

11:00am

Exercising Deep Learning Technique on Earth Datasets for Agriculture
Deep learning (DL) is the hottest method to realize artificial intelligence in many applied science domains. Our ESIPLab project Geoweaver has started to use Deep Learning method in producing crop maps with higher resolution and accuracy than conventional crop map production methods.
The success of DL relies on massive training datasets and powerful compute nodes like Graphics Processing Units (GPU). A good neural network requires careful engineering and considerable domain expertise in network training. It is never easy to fit DL on any Earth dataset. This session will carry out discussion on the research areas, technical details, data sources, and performances of DL in agriculture. We will work on harmonizing and generating a common strategy to connect and prepare Earth datasets for the training/testing of customized deep neural networks to help advance agricultural researches into next level: intelligent agriculture.

Moderators
Thursday January 17, 2019 11:00am - 12:30pm

12:30pm

Lunch
Thursday January 17, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm